My Blog
These Cereals Based On Comic Book Characters Are Awesome

They’re simply Marvelous.

Artists Bamboota and Elliot Fernandez reimagined some of Marvel’s finest characters as delicious cereals.

Artists Bamboota and Elliot Fernandez reimagined some of Marvel's finest characters as delicious cereals.

Bamboota / Elliot Fernandez

Loki Charms are, appropriately, mischievously delicious.

Loki Charms are, appropriately, mischievously delicious.

Bamboota / Elliot Fernandez

And Thorrios offer a free mini-Mjölnir!

And Thorrios offer a free mini-Mjölnir!

Bamboota / Elliot Fernandez

A box of Deadloops also comes with some free, cannon-appropriate swag.

A box of Deadloops also comes with some free, cannon-appropriate swag.

Bamboota / Elliot Fernandez


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT
How Well Do You Actually Know “Scandal”?

Prove that you’re a REAL gladiator.

Test your Gladiator power with the hardest three rounds of Scandal trivia you’ve ever seen.

Test your Gladiator power with the hardest three rounds of Scandal trivia you've ever seen.

The first round will start out with simple trivia, and by the third round you’ll know how big of a fan you actually are.

ABC

Grab your wine and get ready for the first (and easiest) round:

Grab your wine and get ready for the first (and easiest) round:

ABC


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT
If Your Favorite Marvel Characters Had Instagram

Because before you save the universe, you should probably take a selfie.

Captain America

Captain America

Ian Carlos Crawford/Marvel

Ian Carlos Crawford/Marvel

Rocket Raccoon

Rocket Raccoon

Ian Carlos Crawford/Marvel

Loki

Loki

Ian Carlos Crawford/Marvel


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT
This Dachshund Knows There Is Nothing Better Than A Hot Shower After A Long Day

Nothing like a hot steam to unwind. H/T: Tastefully Offensive .

After a hard day, is there anything better than relaxing in some steamy water?

youtube.com

Ask this little guy, he knows what’s up.

Ask this little guy, he knows what's up.

tastefullyoffensive.com

Of course if you’re tiny-sized, a sink does the job just fine.

Of course if you're tiny-sized, a sink does the job just fine.

youtube.com

"Ahhh, just let the stress all melt away."

"Ahhh, just let the stress all melt away."

youtube.com


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT
13 Things For History Lovers To Do Online When They’re Bored

Help out historians by volunteering to transcribe old documents online. Here are some fun projects to work on.

There’s tons of libraries, institutions, archives and historical societies out there that have gobs and gobs of documents, letters, data logs, and basically anything written To fully digitize all this handwritten information, they’re asking for help from volunteers to transcribe the pages.

They’ve already taken photographs or scans of the pages, all you need to do is look at the image and type out what you see written there. That way, the information can be made searchable.

Here are a few really interesting projects that are asking for help transcribing. If you think you can read old timey handwriting, and have an hour or two to spare, help out!

Help the University of Texas with its collection of Texan historical documents

Help the University of Texas with its collection of Texan historical documents

Letters, land claims, sermons, war records, slave sale receipts, advertisements, jail records and more and need transcription. This is one of the more fun ones with a big variety of things that need to be transcribed, as well as being easily sorted by expertise level.

Flickr: ooocha

Uncover the history of the pioneer women of Iowa through their diaries and letters

Uncover the history of the pioneer women of Iowa through their diaries and letters

The University of Iowa’s DIY History project includes a lovely collection of women’s letters, diaries, and other personal papers from the 1800s-1900s. If you ever wanted to read someone’s diary, this is actually doing it for a good cause.

Council Bluffs Public Library / Via Flickr: cbpl

Love shipwrecks? Help catalog the manifests of shipwrecks of the Great Lakes

Love shipwrecks? Help catalog the manifests of shipwrecks of the Great Lakes

The Great Lakes was (and is!) a major shipping route with tons of wrecked ships. Researches need help transcribing a mix of newspapers, handwritten insurance records, and more shipping records. A niche undertaking, sure, but a fascinating project.

Flickr: 13800911@N08


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT
Uber’s Fleet Partnerships Might Be Undercutting Uber’s Promise To Drivers

Companies can rent their older cars out to aspiring Uber drivers, but the costs might not add up. “The [Uber] rates are so cheap … and the commission and gas is too high,” one driver tells BuzzFeed News’ Johana Bhuiyan.

Uber Press Kit

Uber has pegged itself as a service that is good for both riders and drivers. That’s a sentiment the company continues to echo even after it announced the discounted fare prices that the company introduced as a summer promotion in New York City and San Francisco — which aim to make UberX rides cheaper than a taxi — permanent all year-round: Uber provides the best economic opportunity for drivers.

The idea is that Uber drivers are making more money than they did before the price cut, according to Uber NYC General Manager Josh Moher, because they can accept more rides per hour due to a higher demand from customers who like the low rates.

And in drivers’ minds — save for the company’s no-tip policy and the low UberX fares — app-based car services like Uber, Lyft, and Gett do make their lives better. With these services, drivers can make their own hours, don’t have to wait at a base to be dispatched, and are not subject to the whims of a dispatch agent or a “middle man,” as one driver told BuzzFeed News in a previous interview.

But those prospective benefits for drivers are seemingly undercut by a service in New York that Uber hasn’t been touting: the fleet partner program. According to the site, a fleet partner is anyone who owns more than one car in the Uber system and pays the drivers themselves, instead of Uber paying the drivers directly.

Here’s how it works: Car services or private individuals who own more than one car and register with one of Uber’s bases can either rent their cars to or set up a contract with Uber drivers. These fleet partners — who are usually looking to make an extra buck on older cars in their fleet or idle inventory — then accept payment from Uber and pay the driver accordingly. In some cases, fleet partners take a percentage of the drivers’ total fares, in others, fleet partners charge a standard weekly (or in rare cases monthly) rental fee, a price point the fleet partner decides. Theoretically, then, these fleet partners can operate as mini-Uber bases, much of the time mimicking some of the economics and practices of yellow cab or black car bases — fees, lack of flexibility, and middle men.

Uber encourages potential and current fleet partners to look for prospective drivers and renters on the Uber marketplace, which serves as sort of a Craigslist for both drivers looking for cars and renters looking for drivers. Not all listings on the site are for fleet partners, however. Some listings are just car owners looking to cover some of the expenses on a car they may not use often but still need by renting it out to Uber drivers.

At its best, the program offers a low-commitment way of becoming an Uber driver. At its worst, however, drivers can be bound to several months-long contracts where they only see 60% of the net fares — after Uber’s 20% cut and other taxes and fees — and may be forced to pick shifts that are less flexible.


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT
When TV’s Greatest Showrunners Make Mediocre Movies

The Sopranos ’ David Chase and Mad Men ‘s Matthew Weiner have both struggled in their recent big screen ventures. Maybe TV and film aren’t so similar after all?

Owen Wilson and Zach Galifianakis in Are You Here

Millennium Entertainment

The Sopranos and Mad Men aren’t just two of the greatest TV dramas ever made, they’re series that helped usher in the “Golden Age of Television” we’ve been enjoying (and of which may be approaching the end). These shows, one of which wrapped in 2007 and the other of which is closing out its final season next year, have told big stories, novelistic ones about family, class, and America, centered on a pair of complicated, highly imperfect anti-heroes. They’ve defined the “quality drama,” and their creators, David Chase and Matthew Weiner (who worked under Chase on Sopranos), have been major influences in getting TV taken seriously, in showing just how rich and layered a series can be.

So why have their movies been so disappointing?

Chase made his directorial debut toward the end of 2012 with Not Fade Away, a 1960s-set story about Douglas Damiano (John Magaro), a New Jersey teen and then twentysomething dreaming of rock stardom (you can stream it on Netflix). Are You Here, which is now available on DVD and Blu-ray, is technically Weiner’s second film — in 1996, pre-Sopranos, pre-Mad Men, he made What Do You Do All Day?, a black and white indie about a failed writer and compulsive gambler. Are You Here is a slicker affair about an irresponsible local weather man (Owen Wilson) and his bestie (Zach Galifianakis), who has a mental illness.

John Magaro and Bella Heathcote in Not Fade Away.

Barry Wetcher, Paramount Vantage/Indian Paintbrush Productions

They’re easy to have missed. Not Fade Away attracted mixed reviews and flopped at the box office, with not even the lure of Chase reuniting with his Sopranos star James Gandolfini (playing Douglas’ working class dad) proving enough to bring people to the theater. Are You Here, which was originally titled the less-VOD friendly (where alphabetical order counts) but more sensical You Are Here, got a worse critical reception and an even less-publicized release in a scattering of theaters and on VOD before arriving on home video this week.

Chase’s film is a nostalgic, semi-autobiographical story, while Weiner’s is a buddy dramedy, but in one way they’re similar — they’re both scattershot movies with bright moments and no center or easy summation. This seems at least somewhat deliberate for Not Fade Away, the better of the two films, a rock and roll ramble best described by what it isn’t — it’s not about stardom, or living happily ever after, or knowing where you’re headed. Are You Here is just a bewildering tonal jumble that’s sort of about friendship, sort of a romance, sort of a love letter to Pennsylvania Dutch country, sort of a man-child comedy, and an unconvincing character study.

They’re misfires from creators who’ve proven their gifts on the small screen — but they also feel like more than that. At a time when the line between movies and television has gotten more and more porous, when actors wander readily between the two and directors (True Detective's Cary Fukunaga, The Knick's Steven Soderbergh, Top of the Lake's Jane Campion) have been doing the same, Not Fade Away and Are You Here are reminders that TV and film are, still, different mediums with very different demands. Being a great filmmaker doesn’t guarantee you can throw together a great series, as the famous names among the discards of each pilot season suggest. And being a legendary showrunner clearly doesn’t mean you’ll turn out to be a natural at filmmaking.


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT
Facebook Apologizes To LGBT Community, Promises Changes To “Real Names” Policy

In a Facebook post, the company’s chief product officer apologized to “the affected community of drag queens, drag kings, transgender, and extensive community of our friends, neighbors, and members of the LGBT community.”

A sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif.

AP Photo/Ben Margot, File

In an apology to the LGBT community Wednesday, Facebook said it promises to make fixes to how it enforces a long-held policy requiring users to display their “real names” on personal profiles. LGBT community advocates have railed against the policy in recent weeks, saying it unfairly affects transgender users and drag queen performers.

"We owe you a better service and a better experience using Facebook, and we’re going to fix the way this policy gets handled so everyone affected here can go back to using Facebook as you were," said Chris Cox, the company’s chief product officer, in a statement on Facebook. “[W]e see through this event that there’s lots of room for improvement in the reporting and enforcement mechanisms, tools for understanding who’s real and who’s not, and the customer service for anyone who’s affected.”

The development comes after LGBT community advocates met with Facebook representatives, including Cox, at the company’s Menlo Park, Calif. headquarters on Wednesday. Mark Snyder, who was present at meeting and who serves a communications director at Transgender Law Center, said he welcomes the company’s apology and plan as “significant progress.”

"I think that Facebook is going to make sure everyone in our community is able to be their authentic self online," Snyder told BuzzFeed News when reached by phone. "We are grateful for this apology and we look forward to working with Facebook on specific solutions in the coming months. It was a very productive meeting."

In his statement, Cox did not say what specific changes would be made to how the company handles profiles that have been reported to be in violation of the “real names” policy.

In recent weeks, LGBT advocates raised concerns that Facebook’s policy requiring documents to prove users’ “real names” disproportionately impacts the LGBT community; particularly, transgender users and drag queen performers who often use names on their personal profiles that don’t match forms of identification the social network requests for verification.

"Facebook’s requirement that users provide a form of identification to prove their ‘real names’ is unfair and disproportionately impacts our already vulnerable communities," advocates — representing numerous LGBT, immigrant, and anti-violence groups across the country — said in a letter presented to Facebook at the meeting. “This policy lends itself to abuse; some people are using this tool to target and harass our communities with the intent of erasing our identities. Many people need to use a chosen name in order to feel safe or to be able to express their authentic identity online.”

The advocates first met with Facebook officials on Sept. 17, which resulted in the company temporarily reinstating hundreds of accounts that were recently deleted due to reports that the users were violating the policy by using their preferred names or performer names. However, Facebook refused to budge on changing the policy at the time.

Read Cox’s full statement:

View Video ›

Facebook: chris.cox


via IFTTT
25 Disney Pumpkins That Will Get You In The Halloween Spirit

They’re almost too gourd to be true.

This monster, who’s got his pie on you.

instagram.com

The Disney princess with the most guts.

instagram.com

The Disney princesses who are so ready for the cooler weather.

instagram.com

A pumpkin you can’t help but Fall for.

instagram.com


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT
The Adorable Behind-The-Scenes Story Of Penelope Garcia’s Desk On “Criminal Minds”

There’s a method to the knicknacks.

Penelope Garcia has always been cocky.

Penelope Garcia has always been cocky.

CBS

Kirsten Vangsness’ very first line as the FBI technical analyst in the pilot episode of CBS drama Criminal Minds was, “You’ve reached Penelope Garcia and the FBI Department of Supreme Genius.”

CBS


View Entire List ›


via IFTTT